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Law and Newly Restored Democracies: The Philippines Experience in Restoring Political Participation and Accountability

Asian Law Series

No.13

Dr. Raul C. Pangalangan (Ed.) Dean, College of Law University of the Philippines
March 2002
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PDF pdf (725KB)

Title page, Content, etc.  pdf

Preface pdf

Introduction  pdf

Chapter One “Anointing Power with Piety”: People Power, Democracy and the Rule of Law  pdf / Raul C. Pangalangan
 I. Organization
 II. Brief Constitutional History
  A. Malolos Constitution
  B. U.S. “organic acts”
  C. 1935 Constitution
  D. 1973 Constitution
  E. Cory’s Freedom Constitution
  F. The current 1987 Constitution
 III. Institutionalization of “Direct Democracy” after EDSA 1
 IV. A Bogus People’s Initiative to Amend the Constitution
 V. Factual Framework of EDSA 2
 VI. Reconciling EDSA 2 with Constitutional Traditions
 VII. The State of Philippine Constitutional Discourse
 Conclusion

Chapter Two Democratization of the Legislative Executive, and Judicial Departments of Government  pdf / Carmelo V. Sison
 Introduction
 I. The Legislative Department
 II. The Executive Department
 III. The Judicial Department
 Summary
 References

Chapter Three The Revolution After EDSA: Issues of Reconstruction And People Empowerment  pdf / Florin T. Hilbay
 Introduction
 I. The People Power Constitution
  A. Proportional Representation in the House of Representatives
  B. Initiative and Referendum
  C. The Ombudsman
 II. People Power Legislation
  A. The Local Government Code
  B. The Code of Conduct and Ethical Standards Law
 Conclusion

Chapter Four Human Rights in the Philippines: Restoration, Recognition and Institutionalization  pdf / Ibarra M. Gutierrez III
 Introduction
 I. Recognition and Reform
 II. Institutionalized Protection
 III. The Limits of Hope
 IV. Broader Guarantees
 V. Defending the Marginalized
 Conclusion

APPENDIX pdf